A total solar eclipse will take place on 13–14 November 2012.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partially obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon’s apparent diameter is larger than the Sun, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across the surface of the Earth, while a partial solar eclipse will be visible over a region thousands of kilometres wide.  also a new moon that night

The eclipse totality will be visible from northern Australia and the southern Pacific Ocean. The most populous city to experience totality will be Cairns, which will experience 2 minutes of totality just an hour after daybreak (06:38 AEST, 20:38 UTC) with the sun at an altitude of just 14°.

Parts of northern New Zealand including Auckland will experience a partial eclipse with over 80% of the sun obscured. Christchurch and points north will see at least 60% of the sun obscured. Maximum eclipse over New Zealand will occur around 10:30 NZDT (21:30 UTC).

Parts of central Chile, specifically the Los Ríos and Los Lagos regions from Valdivia (63% obscured) south to Quellón (54% obscured) will see a partial eclipse with over half the sun obscured at sunset, over the coast. Points north up to about Santiago will see the eclipse begin as the sun is setting.

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