Time lapse video

The Lyrid meteor shower is active each year from about April 16-25, and we’re now approaching the peak of this shower for 2015. Their peak is typically around April 22 each year (late night April 22 to dawn April 23).

The radiant of the meteor shower is located in the constellation Lyra (The Harp or Lyre), near this constellation’s brightest star, Alpha Lyrae (proper name Vega).

The source of the meteor shower is particles of dust shed by the long-period Comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher.

These April Lyrids are the strongest annual shower of meteors from debris of a long-period comet, mainly because as far as other intermediate long-period comets go (200 – 10,000 years), this one has a relatively short orbital period of about 415 years. The Lyrids have been observed for the past 2600 years.

Still, it is a modest shower and often offers no more than 10 to 20 meteors per hour at its peak, but it has been known to have bursts of activity that could dazzle you.

This year the waxing crescent moon will set in early evening, guaranteeing a dark sky for meteor-watching.

Try to get out there from midnight until dawn.

meteor

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