Geminids in the northern hemisphere by Asim Patel – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, via commons.wikimedia.org

The Geminid meteor shower is a very reliable annual meteor shower that will visit us again in the upcoming week. It will peak the night of December 13 and early morning hours of the 14th and because there will be a thin crescent Moon, there won’t be much light to interfere with viewing.

The showers are caused by the object 3200 Phaethon, which is an asteroid, making this event one of the only major meteor showers not originating from a comet. Phaethon (a name from mythology) is an asteroid with an orbit that brings it closer to the Sun than any other named asteroid.

The meteors appear to come from (radiate from) the constellation Gemini, which rises around sunset and will be almost overhead by 2am. The best views should be between midnight and 4am.

If you’re lucky and you are under a clear, dark sky, you could see up to 120 meteors per hour. And to further make them easier to see, the Geminids are slow-moving dust particles when they hit the Earth’s atmosphere. They are only moving at 22 miles per second, but friction with air molecules will easily burn them up and make a nice incandescent glow for us to watch.

More at www.skyandtelescope.com