moon

There was no Full Moon last month, so did you miss seeing a big Moon in the sky?

Someone asked me how the ancients or Native Americans must have reacted to no Full Moon. They didn’t react at all. The distance between Full Moons is always about the same. We only notice because we are locked into our calendars which are a fairly modern way of viewing time.

Look at some of the names for the March Full Moon. It can be the Fish Moon since frozen waters are melting and fish are more active. It is called the Windy Moon also the Moon of Winds and March is often a windy month. Even Winnie the Pooh would tell you it is a month of blustery days.  I’ve written about the Worm Moon before. And a name with religious connections is the Lenten Moon.

Hopefully, this is not a Big Famine Moon for you. But if your tribe is running low on winter food stocks and it is too early to plant or harvest new crops, that name applies. It is certainly true for many animals. The suburban deer in my neighborhood are pretty desperate for anything green to eat and are grabbing even the tiny shoots of bushes and bulbs that popping up early due to a few early spring days.

March is a month that can look like winter – bare and snow-covered – or like spring – warm with fresh green growth.

Tonight’s Full Moon also coincides with the start of Passover and the eve of Easter.

Tonight is another Blue Moon – that label hung on the second of two full moons in a single calendar month. There is an older definition that defines a Blue Moon as the third of four full moons in a single season. There was a Blue Moon on January 31, 2018 that was also a supermoon with a total eclipse. You don’t get that trifecta too often.

A seasonal Blue Moon (third of four full moons in one season) can occur in the same calendar year, but that would mean there are 13 full moons in one calendar year and 13 full moons in between successive December solstices.

The rarity we associate with the phrase “once in a blue moon” doesn’t seem so rare in recent years. I have posted about blue moons fairly regularly. But two Blue Moons in a single calendar year last happened in 1999. If you’re still around in 2037, February will have no full moon, and the months of January and March will each feature two full moons.

And though the Moon will not be any more “blue” tonight than on other nights, moonlight does tend to look blue in color – especially when you photograph it – so you might get some atmospheric or photographic blue with your moonlight tonight.

Advertisements