You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Sun’ category.

Remember all the hoopla about the total solar eclipse we witnessed in August of last year? There is another partial one today. This Friday the 13th solar eclipse will quite small and be visible mainly over the Southern Ocean area between Australia and Antarctica, so no media coverage here in the U.S.

My thoughts go back to ancient times and what we would now see as strange responses to solar eclipses. How terrifying must this have been to them?

In American Eclipse, there is the story of a Roman emperor who witnessed a total solar eclipse in A.D. 840 and was so upset by this “omen” that he stopped eating and eventually starved to death. Rome went into a civil war.

The Inca feared that a lunar eclipse was caused by a jaguar attacking the moon. They’d try to drive it away by making noise, including beating their dogs to make them howl and bark.

One more positive reaction occurred in the sixth century B.C., during a battle in Asia Minor between the Medes and the Lydians. The eclipse stopped the battle and it was believed that the eclipse was a sign for them to stop the fighting,

Certainly, ancient people looked at the eclipse and had their eyes damaged or were blinded. That certainly added to the fear. Don’t look into the face of God or the gods.

If you were a believer in 13 as an unlucky number and Friday being an unlucky day (more about that aspect here), then adding a solar eclipse made a trifecta of bad luck.

Also take note that solar and lunar eclipses always come in pairs, with one following the other in a period of one fortnight (approximately two weeks).

This is a New Moon supermoon today and is the first Friday the 13th solar eclipse since December 13, 1974. I won’t be blogging about the next one on Friday September 13, 2080..

Well, Earth is at its most distant point from the Sun today.

This position is called aphelion That is a word that came into English in the mid-17th century as an alteration of modern Latin aphelium with a substitution of the Greek inflection -on. Originally, it was the Greek aphhēlion meaning “from the sun.”

But don’t it expect it to seem colder outside. In Paradelle, we are in the midst of a heat wave. It’s summer here and it’s winter in the Southern Hemisphere which reminds us that  our distance from the sun is not what causes the seasons.

When the Earth is closest to the Sun it is called perihelion.

 

Visitors to Paradelle

  • 386,531

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,297 other followers

Follow Weekends in Paradelle on WordPress.com

Archives

I Recently Tweeted…

Tweets from Poets Online

Recent Photos on Flickr

%d bloggers like this: